Relay for Life: Leukemia

It is FN Forum’s first year hosting a booth at Cal Poly Pomona’s Relay for Life on May 18-19, as well as representing the cancer Leukemia.   The information provided is a brief overview of the cancer  along with accompanying  general nutrition information.  Remember to discuss any complications with your healthcare team.

What is Leukemia?

Leukemia is a cancer that affects the blood (specifically white blood cells) and the spongy part of the bone marrow, which is where the blood is formed.

bone marrow

Types of Leukemia

There are many types of cancers classified under Leukemia; the four most common are listed below:

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Often seen in adults aged 60 and over.  AML develops from changes in DNA of developing cells in the bone marrow.  Leukemic cells multiply once in the bone marrow and inhibit the production of normal cells.

  • Signs and Symptoms aches in the arms, legs or back, bruises with no clear reason, pinhead-size red spots under the skin, slow healing of cuts/bleeding, tired or no energy, swollen gums, unexplained weight loss

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Most commonly seen in children, ALL develops when lymphoblasts (white blood cells) grow larger and out of control, blocking the production of normal cells.

  • Signs and Symptoms aches in the arms, legs or back, bruises for no clear reason, enlarged lymph nodes, fever, headache, pale skin, tired or no energy, unexplained weight loss

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) CML begins as a mutation to a single stem cell in the bone marrow causing production of many CML cells than normal cells.

  • Signs and Symptoms discomfort or “dragging” feeling of upper left side (enlarged spleen), tired or no energy, unexplained weight loss

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) The most common type of Leukemia seen in adults, similar to ALL, however the CLL replace normal cells over a longer period of time and generally not as severe as ALL.

  • Signs and Symptoms discomfort or “dragging” feeling of upper left side (enlarged spleen), tired or no energy, unexplained weight loss

Nutrition Information

No diet or food is known to cause, prevent, or treat cancer, however eating the right foods and exercising can help one to stay stronger during and after treatment.  According to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society a balanced diet of nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat proteins such as fish and lean meats is recommended.  Be sure to discuss with your  registered dietitian on specific dietary guidelines as Leukemia and treatment including a Bone Marrow Transplant  greatly affect your immune system and the types of foods you are able to eat.

Helpful Links

Pictures from event coming soon…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s